EDU11 FILM SOUND STUDY – BOY by Taika Waititi

Back in 2009 I had the great pleasure of being the Sound Designer and putting together the sound post team for Taikas film BOY, and as it is one of the favourite films I have worked on I thought I would use it as a case study. If you would like to take part in this film sound study, you will need to get a copy of the film yourself. First so that you can watch it with no prior knowledge, but also so you can refer back to scenes as we discuss them.

Boy New Official Trailer

BOY by Taika Waititi at IMDB

I did a quick search to see where it is available for streaming or purchase.
My results will be skewed to my location but I found all of these options.

BOY at Amazon Prime

BOY at Apple TV

BOY at Netflix

BOY at Youtube

BOY BluRay or DVD at Amazon

If you want to take part I’ll need you to do two things:
First access a copy of the film and watch it with a good sound system.
Second reply with a comment to this post.

I will take the number of comments as encouragement to start the film sound study.

Phone off. Lights off. Enjoy the movie!

 

 

5 thoughts on “EDU11 FILM SOUND STUDY – BOY by Taika Waititi

  1. Thibault Receveur says:

    Hey Tim!

    Just watched the movie for the first time and I had an absolute blast discovering it! Such a touching and lively story!

    I come from a rural area in France, and I was absolutely blown away by the precision of the sound of countryside in this movie, whether from the wind, the birds, the hinges of the paddocks the old house creaks, and so on. I’ve never been to NZ and yet it felt like rural New Zealand and no other place. But also the proximity and lively sounds you used just felt so genuine!

    Now I have a few questions:

    What was your philosophy to convey the emotion we were in rural NZ and any other place?

    What mics did you use to record these sounds?

    What was the philosophy to convey the sound of more “funny” parts and then the more “touching” moments ?

    One scene at the end, with the cemetery door hinge creak particularly marked me. It sounded warm and simple, like an open door from a garden you push before going back home (a bit like in The Return of the Kings, when Sam comes back home scene with his wife and kids). What was your approach to create such feeling?

    Thanks for the Film Study opportunity, it’s a great idea for inspiring Sound Designers.

    Kind Regards,

    Thibault

    • Tim Prebble says:

      Thanks Thibault – thats a great positive response. It is such a fun quirky film. I’ve made a note of your questions and will answer thm all as we work through all the stages of the films sound post. First I am going to start with the script and what it motivated. One simple example, when I read the scene with the cannabis plantation set in a corn field I had a sudden realisation that by the time we started sound post that field would be long gone. So I decided to go visit the set during the shoot, so I could capture it and as many other authentic ambiences as I could. Its quite a drive, from my studio (then in Miramar, Wellington – across the road from Park Road Post where we mixed the film) to Waihau Bay where the film is set, is a 700km/435mile drive taking approx 9 hours. But as soon as I committed to doing that I also realised I could access the vehicles in the film too. But I’ll explain all of that as I want to work through the process in the order we actually did it. So first is the script & pitching to do the film!

      • Thibault Receveur says:

        What would be films if they hadn’t a pinch of quirkiness in them !😄

        That’s very interesting and it’s also a great philosophy to follow as to understand the evolution through the seasons of the subject you want to record. What you can find at a given time of the year (be it animals or crops) and how it sounds may differ depending on where you are located or what season it is! Thanks for the tip !

        I’m sure I wouldn’t mind driving through beautiful New Zealand for 9 hours to record sound.🤗

        Looking forward to reading the next part of your Sound Story for this film! Thank you again for sharing 😁

        Best,

        Thibault

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